DRA Top Docs

Diagnostic Radiology Associates has a long and respected history of physician excellence. DRA physicians represent specialized expertise in CT (general and musculoskeletal), ultrasound, nuclear medicine, (general and cardiac), MRI (pediatric and adult neuroradiological and musculoskeletal) and interventional radiology. Our physicians are Board Certified and have trained at premier universities throughout the country. Several maintain clinical faculty positions at Yale School of Medicine.

Also on staff at DRA are three Physician Assistants (PAs), Daniel Baxter, PA-C, Justin Champagne, PA-C and Ross Utter, PA-C. Physician assistants (PAs) are licensed health care professionals who practice medicine under the direct supervision of physicians. PAs work in virtually all medical and surgical specialties as part of physician-PA teams. In addition to providing quality healthcare to patients, PAs alleviate some of the burden experienced by physicians and free physicians to perform more complex cases or read more cases.

DRA has become one of the most respected and experienced radiology practices in Connecticut. We are proud of our history and look forward to continuing our imaging excellence to the people of Greater Waterbury.


Kenneth Allen

Kenneth S. Allen,
M.D.
(Click for bio)

Duncan J. Belcher,
M.D.
(Click for bio)

Stewart R. Berliner,
M.D.
(Click for bio)

Anthony R. Carter,
M.D.
(Click for bio)

 

John C. DeLeon,
M.D.
(Click for bio)

 

Eric A. Hyson,
M.D., FACR
(Click for bio)

 

Andrew J. Lawson,
M.D., FACR
(Click for bio)

 

Marco Verga,
M.D.
(Click for bio)

 

Justin L. Champagne,
MHS, PA-C
(Click for bio)

 

Ross G. Utter, MHS, MBA, PA-C
(Click for bio)

 

 


Doctor's Corner

Eric Hyson, MD, FACR Explains 3-D Mammography

Beginning in mid-January 2016, Diagnostic Radiology Associates will be offering 3-D (tomosynthesis) digital mammography at our Grandview Ave. office in Waterbury. 3-D mammography is the latest improvement in imaging to detect breast cancer. Conventional 2-D mammography produces pictures in which an X-ray passes through the breast along a single line, giving an image in which all of the breast structures along that line are overlapped with each other. This overlap is not much of an issue in a breast composed mostly of fat, because fat is relatively “clear” to X-rays, so that an underlying breast cancer is usually easily seen through the fat. Read more »